How to Get Asbestos Companies to Pay

Mesothelioma has been widely publicized for its link to asbestos, but asbestos has also been linked to other deadly diseases like lung cancer and asbestosis. Over 3,000 people are diagnosed with mesothelioma every year in the United States. Mesothelioma has been directly linked to exposure to asbestos, which were and still are used by asbestos companies despite its dangerous health effects. You may be entitled to receive compensation for your mesothelioma or another asbestos-related disease.

The first step you should take is to find a mesothelioma attorney who has a good track record and will be able to win the asbestos settlement you deserve. Given that most mesothelioma victims are given a life expectancy of one to two years after their diagnosis, these lawsuits often result in high settlements. Mesothelioma Many even receive multi-million dollar settlements to compensate for their pain and suffering, as well as assist their families.

To guarantee that your mesothelioma case gets tried or that a mesothelioma settlement can be negotiated, it is imperative to provide your mesothelioma attorney with as much detailed information as you can regarding your work history, including your employer’s name, job location, job description and any other important details. This will allow you and your lawyer to pinpoint the time period and location of your asbestos exposure.

It is also vital to your case that you provide all of your medical records relating to your mesothelioma diagnosis and prognosis. The more you can provide, the better off you and your case will be. It may even help bolster the financial award you truly deserve, as asbestos companies will often try and get away with the smallest settlement.

With mesothelioma, time is always of the essence. State statutes of limitations may often present an obstacle, so it’s important to contact a mesothelioma lawyer who will be able to streamline the process. Mesothelioma is difficult enough to cope with and receiving compensation for something that wasn’t your fault should not add to your suffering.

Asbestos in Gas Masks

We all know the benefits that a prop may bring to a teacher in a history lesson to aid students with the learning process as they get to physically see and feel the item themselves to get a better understanding of what the teacher is explaining. But when the subject is WWII this could be a potentially hazardous subject to both students and teachers, especially if the item of that period is a WWII Mask.

Why would a WWII Gas Mask be dangerous?

WWII gas masks are potentially dangerous as they can contain and release asbestos fibres. They can also be contaminated with harmful chemicals from previous use in gas drills. In addition some post war gas masks can release asbestos fibres and can be contaminated.

Tests have shown that asbestos fibres can be inhaled by wearing the masks. Asbestos fibres can also be released from handling the masks, filters or carrying bag.

So why use asbestos in gas masks?

After the widespread use of poison gas in the Great War it was expected that gas would also be a major factor in WWII so civilians as well as military personnel were provided with gas masks.

How many gas masks were produced and what types of asbestos were used?

It is difficult to put an exact number on how many of these asbestos containing gas masks were manufactured but to put it in perspective one company in Blackburn, Lancashire had a contract from the government in 1936 to make 70 million and production continued throughout the war.

There were two main types of asbestos used during the manufacture of these gas masks: Chrysotile (white asbestos) for civilian respirators and Crocidolite (blue asbestos) for those equipping the armed forces. The health risks associated with these masks only came to light post-war when factory workers making the masks started showing abnormally high numbers of deaths from cancer.

Why is asbestos dangerous?

The Health & Safety Executive website warns: “Breathing in air containing asbestos fibres can lead to asbestos-related diseases, mainly cancers of the lungs and chest lining. Asbestos is only a risk to health if asbestos fibres are released into the air and breathed in. Past exposure to asbestos currently kills around 4,000 people a year in Great Britain. This number is expected to go on rising at least until 2016.

There is no cure for asbestos-related diseases. There is usually a long delay between first exposure to asbestos and the onset of disease. This can vary from 15 to 60 years.”

What should a school or a collector do if they own one of these Asbestos containing Gas Masks?

The local authority should be contacted for advice on how to safely dispose of the masks, filters and the canvas bags. In 2004 the Imperial War Museum had issued the following guidance to their staff:

“Most British gas masks of WW2 vintage have asbestos (blue and/or white) as a component in their filters… Where unsure, it should be assumed that the filters do contain asbestos until proven otherwise. The filters may, in any case, contain other respiratory irritants. Thus no gas mask of WW2 vintage should ever be worn.

Note:

There is a further health and safety issue with gas masks that have been exposed to chemicals eg used in ‘live’ gas tests and drills. Such gas masks should not be handled and should not go on display. They should be sealed in polyethylene bags (at least two layers) or an airtight inert container. This should be carried out in a fume cupboard, whilst wearing latex or nitrile gloves and a lab coat. The gloves should be disposed of and the lab coat disposed of/laundered after use. The enclosures should be labelled to indicate that they contain materials that are potentially hazardous and should not be opened. Any further enclosures that they are placed into, eg boxes, should be appropriate labelled as described above.

How to Sense Low Levels of Asbestos in Your Daily Environment

My discovery came to me by accidentally removing an asbestos

material in my home. The resulting condition of the whole house

after this accident left me with a sore chest, dry and unbearably iching skin and eyes. My wife complained of extreme thirst and my oldest son, age 14, developed severe asthma. This

all continued for five to six months. During this time I tried

desparately to determine if we were living in an unsafe level of asbestos. The material that I had removed was tested and found to

contain 20% crysitile asbestos. Air sampling proved to be unreliable because the area had been ventilated so well. But the furnishings, carpets, walls and all other personal belongings

were covered the remnants of the demolition.Everyone wanted to play down the seriousness of the situation, but, to me it was

obviously not a healthy environment.

So, I set out to try to logically deduce, with a knowledge of the physical properties of asbestos,when I encountered the substance as I attempted to clean every surface and item in every room of the house.

That was fifteen years ago. During that time, as I learned

more about where we all encounter asbestos materials on a daily basis. I made mental notes concerning my and others’ reactions

to these encounters. Many situations have arisen ranging from

sore throats and skin conditions(acne and basil cell skin cancer) to asthma, pneumonia and death. I don’t have clinical

proof of these claims I’ve made, except to say “if it looks, walks and sounds like a duck it probably is a duck”. Many times clinical trials are verified by producing the same results in subsequent testing. Deductive reasoning can also be verified

in the same way. If the same results are observed again and again after low level exposure to these remnants then that is

proof to me.

Without writing a book, I wouldn’t have the space to detail every observation I’ve made during this period, but I can assure you that no contact with asbestos is without a possible adverse health consequence.

Asbestos is a very lightweight chrystal-like material with highly static electrical properties. It often produces a static

discharge like when one is shocked by touching the metal switch plate or door knob in their home. It often leaves a bitter-salty taste in your mouth. It can stay airborne for days at a time. It absorbs moisture and produces a very dry environment (which only makes the static electric situation worse.)

The loose material may be accidentally contacted in a number of

building types and situations.

Many buildings built before 1977 have vinyl asbestos floor tile. No one can avoid walking on this, if they enter the building. This is fine if the floor is well maintained. Look out for broken or worn and never waxed tile. This applies to any

location in the building, commercial or residential. Closets are

very seldom waxed. Items stored there will accumulate certain

amounts of this substance.

Anytime an older building is renovated the possibility exists

for a number of materials containing asbestos to be encountered.

The contractor does’t always do the right thing. In many instances it is cheaper to pay the fine if he is caught. So he just tears it out and throws it in the dumpster or hauls it to the dump himself. As a consequence, many newly renovated stores

have a certain amount of this dust on the shelves and new merchandise in the store.

There are many more instances of contact for which I don’t have the time to detail here, but basically, with the characteristics of the material, knowledge of where you may encounter the substance and many hours of observation (I’ve been in construction over thirty years), you too can make the same

deductive conclutions that I have made.

In subsequent articles I intend to go into detail on the unique physical properties of asbestos and how this promotes detection in your hair and clothes. In future articles I would also like to expand on the many other health effects I’ve noticed, such as acne, which could benefit many young adults and a number of people who continue with this complexion problem into adulthood.

For more information on this subject see these sites:

www.livingwithasbestos.com [http://www.livingwithasbestos.com]

http://ezinearticles.com/?id=25139